A homogeneous population of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells is incapable of killing virus-, bacteria-, or parasite-infected macrophages

Arturo Zychlinsky*, Michele Karim, Ruta Nonacs, John Ding E. Young

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous reports have suggested a role for natural killer (NK) cells in directly lysing host cells infected with bacteria and other intracellular microorganisms. Here, we determined the inability of a highly homogeneous population of lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells to kill macrophages infected with the following intracellular parasites: Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Legionella pneumophila, Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi. In parallel cytotoxicity assays, LAK cells lysed the tumor targets YAC-1 and P815 effectively. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that influenza-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), but not LAK cells, were efficient killers of influenza virus-infected macrophages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-267
Number of pages7
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 01 1990
Externally publishedYes

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