A pilot randomised controlled trial of ride-on cars and postural combinations of standing and sitting for mobility and social function in toddlers with motor delays

Hsiang Han Huang*, Yu Wen Chu, Ai Tzu Chan, Chia ling Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Locomotor experiences in upright postures are essential for developing toddlers’ mobility and social functions. This pilot randomised controlled trial aimed to examine the effectiveness of using a modified ride-on car (ROC) with postural combinations of standing and sitting on mobility and social function in toddlers with motor delays. Materials and methods: Nineteen participants aged 1–3 years with mild, moderate or severe motor delays were randomly assigned to four ROC groups. The ROC groups had different combinations of standing and sitting, namely standing for 70 min (ROC-Stand70, five participants), standing for 45 min (ROC-Stand45, four participants), standing for 25 min (ROC-Stand25, five participants) and sitting for 70 min (ROC-Sit70, five participants). All participants participated in 2-h sessions twice a week for 12 weeks. The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, Goal Attainment Scaling and Bayley-III tests were administered before and after the intervention, and after 12 weeks of follow-up. A mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare inter- and intra-group differences. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03707405). Results: All groups showed significantly improved mobility, social function and goal achievement at the post-test (p < .001). However, no significant changes were observed in Bayley scores. Conclusions: Combining physical and social environmental modifications with active exploration is crucial for early power mobility training in toddlers with motor delays. To enhance the robustness and generalisability of our findings, future studies should include larger sample sizes, consider variations in motor delays, and measure energy expenditure during the intervention.Implications for rehabilitation Providing active exploratory experience using ride-on cars (ROCs) with various postural combinations can improve a child’s mobility. The ROC training with various postural combinations can improve social function, and the degree of improvement may depend on the severity of motor delays. Setting goals with caregivers and incorporating their roles in the training process can empower them to interact with children more frequently and actively.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Ride-on car
  • goal achievements
  • mobility
  • postural combination
  • social function

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