Adolescents with Atopic Dermatitis Have Lower Peak Exercise Load Capacity and Exercise Volume Compared with Unaffected Peers

Tsung Hsun Yang, Po Cheng Chen, Yun Chung Lin, Yan Yuh Lee, Yu Hsuan Tseng, Wen Hsin Chang, Ling Sai Chang, Chia Hsuan Lin, Ho Chang Kuo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sweating and increased skin temperature caused by exercise can reduce physical activity and the willingness to exercise in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. This study was conducted to investigate the exercise load capacity of adolescents with atopic dermatitis and analyzed their exercise behavior and motivation. Methods: Adolescents with and without atopic dermatitis were assigned to the atopic dermatitis group and control group (n = 27 each). Both groups completed a cardiopulmonary exercise test and questionnaires to assess their exercise capacity, weekly exercise volume, exercise motivation, and self-efficacy, respectively. Results: The ratio of measured forced vital capacity to the predicted forced vital capacity and the peak oxygen consumption of the atopic dermatitis group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire scores of the atopic dermatitis group were significantly lower than those of the control group. As for the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire 2, the scores for the introjected and identified regulations of the atopic dermatitis group were significantly lower than those of the control group. Regarding the Multidimensional Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale, the scheduling efficacy and total scores of the atopic dermatitis group were significantly lower than those of the control group. Conclusions: Adolescents with atopic dermatitis had lower peak exercise capacity and lower weekly exercise volume. Furthermore, they lacked the negative feelings toward inactivity and the self-confidence to plan regular exercise independently. The results of this study suggest that adolescents with atopic dermatitis should be encouraged to engage in regular indoor exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10285
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors.

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • atopic dermatitis
  • exercise
  • exercise test
  • motivation
  • self-efficacy

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