An Outpatient-Based Training Program Improves Family Caregivers' Preparedness in Caring for Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Yi En Tung, Li Min Kuo, Min Chi Chen, Wen Chuin Hsu, Yea Ing Lotus Shyu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

Abstract

Background Little is known regarding the effects of training programs on family caregivers of older persons with mild cognitive impairment because of the significant differences in outcome variables measured in the various studies in the literature. Purpose This study was designed to examine the effects of an outpatient-based caregiver training program on the preparedness, health-related quality of life, and depressive symptoms of participants responsible for caring for older persons with mild cognitive impairment. Methods A randomized clinical trial was implemented. Of the 54 family caregiver participants who provided complete and valid data, 28 and 26 were assigned to the experimental and control groups, respectively. The experimental group participated in a researcher-developed training program that provided information on mild cognitive impairment, strategies for maintaining and promoting cognitive function in persons with mild cognitive impairment, managing their own and their care recipients' healthcare, and managing their own emotional support and stress. Outcomes (caregiver preparedness, health-related quality of life, and depressive symptoms) were assessed before the start of the training program (baseline) and at 1, 3, and 6 months after completion of the program. Results After controlling for baseline cognitive function of the care recipients and of caregiver preparedness, the experimental group was shown to be significantly less prepared than the control group at baseline (β = -1.41, p =.031) and better prepared than the control group at all three posttests (group differences: 1.3, 1.53, and 4.24, respectively), with the difference at the third posttest (6 months) reaching statistical significance (p =.008). No impact of the intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms or health-related quality of life was found at posttest. Conclusions The training intervention in this study was found to increase the perceived preparedness of the family caregiver participants to handle various aspects of providing care to persons with mild cognitive impairment. However, no changes were found in depressive symptoms or health-related quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E252
JournalJournal of Nursing Research
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 01 02 2023

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2023 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • family caregiver training program
  • health-related quality of life
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • preparedness
  • Humans
  • Cognition
  • Caregivers/psychology
  • Outpatients
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Quality of Life
  • Cognitive Dysfunction/therapy
  • Aged

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