An Updated Review of Genetic Associations With Severe Adverse Drug Reactions: Translation and Implementation of Pharmacogenomic Testing in Clinical Practice

Chuang Wei Wang, Ivan Arni C. Preclaro, Wei Hsiang Lin, Wen Hung Chung*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adverse drug reactions (ADR) remain the major problems in healthcare. Most severe ADR are unpredictable, dose-independent and termed as type B idiosyncratic reactions. Recent pharmacogenomic studies have demonstrated the strong associations between severe ADR and genetic markers, including specific HLA alleles (e.g., HLA-B*15:02/HLA-B*57:01/HLA-A*31:01 for carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions [SCAR], HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-SCAR, HLA-B*57:01 for abacavir-hypersensitivity, HLA-B*13:01 for dapsone/co-trimoxazole-induced SCAR, and HLA-A*33:01 for terbinafine-induced liver injury), drug metabolism enzymes (such as CYP2C9*3 for phenytoin-induced SCAR and missense variant of TPMT/NUDT15 for thiopurine-induced leukopenia), drug transporters (e.g., SLCO1B1 polymorphism for statin-induced myopathy), and T cell receptors (Sulfanilamide binding into the CDR3/Vα of the TCR 1.3). This mini review article aims to summarize the current knowledge of pharmacogenomics of severe ADR, and the potentially clinical use of these genetic markers for avoidance of ADR.

Original languageEnglish
Article number886377
JournalFrontiers in Pharmacology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - 25 04 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Wang, Preclaro, Lin and Chung.

Keywords

  • CYP
  • adverse drug reactions
  • drug transporter
  • drug-induced liver injury
  • human leukocyte antigens
  • stevens-johnson syndrome
  • toxic epidermal necrolysis

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