Association between ambient particulate matter 2.5 exposure and mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Chern Horng Lee, Sen Yung Hsieh, Wen Hung Huang, I. Kuan Wang, Tzung Hai Yen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Air pollution is a severe public health problem in Taiwan. Moreover, Taiwan is an endemic area for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study examined the effect of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) exposure on mortality in this population. A total of 1003 patients with HCC treated at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between 2000 and 2009 were included in this study. At the end of the analysis, 288 (28.7%) patients had died. Patients with HCC living in environments with PM2.5 concentrations of ≥36 µg/m3 had a higher mortality rate than patients living in environments with PM2.5 concentrations of <36 µg/m3 (36.8% versus 27.5%, p = 0.034). The multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that PM2.5 ≥ 36 µg/m3 was a significant risk factor for mortality (1.584 (1.162–2.160), p = 0.004). A nonlinear relationship was observed between the odds ratio and PM2.5. The odds ratio was 1.137 (1.015–1.264) for each increment of 5 µg/m3 in PM2.5 or 1.292 (1.030–1.598) for each increment of 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5. Therefore, patients with HCC exposed to ambient PM2.5 concentrations of ≥36 µg/m3 had a 1.584-fold higher risk of death than those exposed to PM2.5 concentrations of <36 µg/m3. Further studies are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2490
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 02 07 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Mortality
  • PM
  • Particulate matter

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