Association between chronic viral hepatitis and metabolic syndrome in southern Taiwan: a large population-based study

Yuan Hung Kuo, Kwong Ming Kee, Jing Houng Wang, Nien Tzu Hsu, Chang Chun Hsiao, Yi Chen, Sheng Nan Lu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on hepatitis is an interesting issue. Aim: To evaluate the association of MetS and chronic viral hepatitis including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in southern Taiwan. Methods: From 2004 to 2013, a series of community-based health screenings for residents aged 40 and older were held in Tainan city. MetS was defined according to the Joint Scientific Statement. Cut-offs of body-mass index measures of 24 kg/m2 and 27 kg/m2 were used to stratify lean, overweight and obese subjects. Results: We enrolled 180 359 participants; the prevalence of MetS was 30.1%, which was significantly associated with advanced age and female sex. There were 18 726 (10.4%) HBV, 13 428 (7.4%) HCV, 1337 (0.7%) HBV plus HCV (B+C) and 146 868 (81.5%) non-HBV non-HCV participants (NBNC). Prevalence rates of MetS in subjects with HBV, HCV, B+C and NBNC were 25.2%, 31.5%, 28.9% and 30.7% respectively (P < 0.001). There were 18.8% lean body, 35.4% overweight and 45.8% obese participants among 54 361 MetS subjects. Lean MetS subjects were older, had more diabetes, and had higher metabolic component levels, but lower alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase-platelet ratio index levels compared with obese MetS subjects. HCV infection was positively associated with MetS (P < 0.001). However, HBV infection was inversely associated with MetS only among lean subjects (P = 0.002), but not among the general population. Conclusions: This large population-based study indicated that HCV infection was positively associated with MetS. However, HBV infection was inversely associated with MetS only among lean subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)993-1002
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 11 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • community study
  • hepatitis B virus
  • hepatitis C virus
  • metabolic syndrome

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