Comparison of physical and psychosocial function post-treatment among oral cancer patients with low-to-moderate and high nicotine dependence.

HL Peng, LY Lee, BS Huang, CY Lin, Ying-Ling Chang, CF Chung, SC Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

After suddenly stopping smoking after an initial oral cancer (OC) diagnosis, patients may restart smoking and nicotine dependence. This study sought to identify factors associated with high nicotine dependence in OC patients who restarted smoking post-treatment. A cross-sectional study. A group of 220 OC patients who restarted smoking post-treatment were recruited from the outpatient radiation department of a single cancer center in northern Taiwan. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, and patients were assessed for nicotine and smoking dependence, physical activity and function, socio-emotional function, social support, and depression. Among patients who restarted smoking after treatment for OC, 75.9% reported low-to-moderate dependence on smoking, while 24.1% reported high nicotine dependence. Factors associated with high nicotine dependence included higher incidence of smoking per day, greater dependence on smoking, less physical activity per week, and poorer social-emotional function. Those highly dependent on nicotine were younger, unmarried, had less education, and had begun smoking earlier than those with low-to-moderate nicotine dependence. The amount of smoking per day, greater smoking behavioral dependence, less physical activity per week, and worse social-emotional function affected high nicotine dependence. Smoking cessation training and counseling for OC patients may help them better control their use of tobacco after treatment.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalJournal of Nursing Scholarship
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

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