Decreasing recurrence and increasing survival rates in patients of ethmoid or sphenoid intestinal-type adenocarcinomas: Systematic review and meta-analysis with 1126 cases

Ethan I. Huang*, Ang Lu, Yao Te Tsai, Ting Chung Wang, Huei Chieh Chuang, Wen Cheng Chen, Ping Tsung Chen, Shigao Huang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background:Ethmoid or sphenoid intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (ITACs) form a distinct subtype of sinonasal adenocarcinomas that occur less than 1 case/100,000/yr. They have obvious exposure relationship to hardwood or leather dusts, infrequent metastasis, but a relatively high local-recurrence rate. They locate at sinuses close to vital structures listed as high-risk areas in surgeries. Even in expert hands, a craniofacial resection is associated with non-negligible mortality and morbidity. Management of these tumors, first or recurrent, needs to weigh these consequences versus the survival, regional-recurrence, and distant-recurrence rates. Due to the rareness of ethmoid or sphenoid ITACs, accurate overall survival and local- or regional-recurrence rates across diverse treatments are unclear. The aim of this study is to report the overall statistics of this cancer and the relationship between enrollment year versus age, recurrence, and survival.Methods:Systemic review and meta-analysis with 1126 cases across various treatments in the literature.Results:Here, we show that patients of ethmoid or sphenoid ITACs had overall local-, regional-, and distant-recurrence rates of 32.2%, 2.2%, and 10.3%, respectively, with a 5-year overall survival rate of 66.2%. The results present a significant correlation between age, local-recurrent rate, or overall survival rate versus enrollment year.Conclusion:This suggests that recent patients of ethmoid or sphenoid ITACs may present at an older mean age, have a lower local-recurrence rate, and have a better 5-year survival rate than before. There was a shifting trend of treating ethmoid ITACs from external approach to endoscopic resection. Clinicians may want to weigh mortality and morbidity rates of external surgeries and these data to share or decide a solution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E27341
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume100
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 10 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • craniectomy
  • craniofacial resection
  • malignancy
  • neoplasm
  • rhinotomy
  • skull base

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