Do maternal interactive behaviors correlate with developmental outcomes and mastery motivation in toddlers with and without motor delay?

Pei Jung Wang, George A. Morgan, Ai Wen Hwang, Li Chiou Chen, Hua Fang Liao*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Maternal interactive behaviors theoretically affect developmental outcomes and mastery motivation in young children. However, these associations are inconsistent in the literature.

Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine the differences in maternal behaviors between toddlers with motor delay (MD) and those with typical development (TD), (2) to investigate the correlation of maternal behaviors and developmental quotients (DQs) in toddlers with MD and TD, and (3) to examine the correlation of maternal behaviors and mastery motivation in toddlers with MD and TD.

Design This was a sex- and mental age–matched case-control study.

Methods Twenty-two mother-child dyads of toddlers with MD (ages 23–47 months) and 22 dyads of sex- and mental age–matched toddlers with TD (ages 15–29 months) were recruited. Maternal scores from the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale, 2 indicators of motivation (persistence and mastery pleasure) from individualized mastery tasks and the Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire, and DQs from the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Children were assessed.

Results Mothers of children in the MD group showed significantly lower cognitive growth fostering scores than mothers of children in the TD group. Maternal total scores were significantly correlated with whole DQs in both groups. In the MD group, maternal total scores correlated significantly with DMQ mastery pleasure but not with mastery task motivation.

Limitations The study design makes it impossible to know the causal relationships between maternal behaviors and children’s DQs and motivation.

Conclusions Mothers of toddlers with MD exhibited less adequate interactive behaviors than mothers of toddlers with TD. Because higher-quality maternal behaviors correlated with higher DQs in the MD group, clinicians should encourage parents to participate in early intervention programs and model high-quality parenting behavior to enhance parents’ and children’s outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1744-1754
Number of pages11
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume94
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 01 12 2014

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do maternal interactive behaviors correlate with developmental outcomes and mastery motivation in toddlers with and without motor delay?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this