Effects of acebutolol on paroxysmal atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia in patients with manifest or concealed accessory pathways

H. C. Kou, S. J. Yeh, F. C. Lin, J. S. Hung, D. Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electrophysiologic studies before and after administration of 50 mg of intravenous (IV) acebutolol were performed in 20 patients. Four of the 20 had persistent preexcitation, two had intermittent preexcitation, and 14 had a concealed retrogradely conducting accessory pathway (AP). Acebutolol depressed anterograde AP conduction with loss of preexcitation in one patient and increased the effective refractory period of AP in the remaining three; in most, it depressed anterograde normal pathway conduction. The longest atrial paced cycle length producing atrioventricular (AV) nodal block increased from 290 ± 7 to 319 ± 6 msec (mean ± SEM) after acebutolol (p <0.01). Acebutolol had no significant effect on retrograde AP conduction. Sustained AV reentrant tachycardia was inducible in all 20 patients before acebutolol and in 19 after acebutolol. The cycle length of tachycardia increased from 323 ± 8 to 352 ± 8 msec after acebutolol (p <0.01), reflecting an increment of A-H interval from 148 ± 8 to 174 ± 9 msec (p <0.01). Electrophysiologic studies were repeated after 800 mg of oral acebutolol given in four divided doses at six-hour intervals in eight patients. The results were comparable to those of IV acebutolol. Thus, acebutolol depresses AV nodal conduction and slows the rate of AV reentrant tachycardia, but is generally ineffective in inhibiting the induction of sustained tachycardia. It occasionally depresses anterograde AP conduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-97
Number of pages6
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

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