Effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on serum adhesion molecules, and serum oxidative stress in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

Hung Chen Wang, Pei Ming Wang, Yu Tsai Lin, Nai Wen Tsai, Yun Ru Lai, Chia Te Kung, Chih Min Su, Cheng Hsien Lu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Serum concentrations of adhesion molecules and oxidative stress is thought to participate in the pathobiology of secondary brain injury after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to study the hypothesis that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) both improves the adhesion molecules levels and antioxidant capacity. Methods: Thirty blood samples from ten patients after acute TBI were obtained after injury and before and after HBOT. Four patients received early HBOT started two weeks after injury, four patients received late HBOT started ten weeks after injury and two patients did not receive HBOT and served as control in this study. The HBOT patients received total 30 times HBOT in six weeks period. Results: Those serum biomarkers in patients with TBI had not significantly difference in glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), soluble intercellular cell adhesion-molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) concentrations on admission between early HBOT, late HBOT, and control group (p = 0.916, p = 0.98, p = 0.306, and p = 0.548, respectively). Serum GSH levels were higher at 10 weeks after injury in the early HBOT group than in the late HBOT group and control group (mean, 1.40 μmol/L, 1.16 μmol/L, and 1.05 μmol/L, respectively). Then the serum GSH level was increased at 18 weeks after injury in the late HBOT group (mean, 1.49 μmol/L). However, there was only statistically significant difference at Weeks 18 (p = 0.916, p = 0.463, and p = 0.006, at Week 2, Week 10, and Week 18, respectively). Serum TBARS levels were decreased at 10 weeks after injury in the early HBOT group than in the late HBOT group and control group (mean, 11.21 μmol/L, 17.23 μmol/L, and 17.14 μmol/L, respectively). Then the serum TBARS level was decreased at 18 weeks after injury in the late HBOT group (mean, 12.06 μmol/L). There was statistically significant difference after HBOT (p = 0.98, p = 0.007, and p = 0.018, at Week 2, Week 10, and Week 18, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the three groups on sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 levels from Week 2 to Week 18. Conclusions: HBOT can improve serum oxidative stress in patients after TBI. These molecules may be added as evaluation markers in clinical practice. Perhaps in the future it may also become part of the treatment of patients after acute traumatic brain injury. Further large-scale study may be warrant.

Original languageEnglish
Article number985
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Adhesion molecules
  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
  • Oxidative stress
  • Traumatic brain injury

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