Environmental carbon monoxide level is associated with the level of high-sensitivity c-reactive protein in peritoneal dialysis patients

Wen Hung Huang*, Tzung Hai Yen, Ming Jen Chan, Yi Jiun Su

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Inflammation is highly prevalent among peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is the most widely used inflammatory marker in clinical medicine and is correlated with mortality in PD patients. Air pollution is associated with systemic inflammation. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the role of air pollutants and other clinical variables on hs-CRP values in PD patients. We recruited a total of 175 patients who had been undergoing continuous ambulatory PD or automated PD for at least 4 months and regularly followed up. Air pollution levels were recorded by a network of 27 monitoring stations near or in the patients living areas throughout Taiwan. The 12-month average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of <10 and <2.5mm (PM10 and PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O3) were included. In stepwise linear regression, after adjustment for related factors, white blood cell count (β: 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.71, 2.11]) and CO level (β: 0.17, 95% CI [2.5, 21.32]) were positively associated with hs-CRP and serum albumin levels (β:-0.25, 95% CI [-13.69,-3.96]) and normalized protein nitrogen appearance (β:-0.18, 95% CI [-17.7,-2.51]) was negatively associated with hs-CRP. However, serum indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate levels were not significantly associated with hs-CRP (P >0.05). In PD patients, the environmental CO level was positively correlated with hs-CRP level.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume93
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 11 2014

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