Evaluation of quantitative buffy coat analysis in the detection of canine Dirofilaria immitis infection: A model to determine its effectiveness in the diagnosis of human filariasis

Lian Chen Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Quantitative buffy coat (QBC) analysis has been reported to have a high degree of methodical sensitivity in the detection of human filariasis. This study was conducted to evaluate its usefulness in the diagnosis of filariasis using a Dirofilaria immitis/dog model. By necropsy of 244 stray dogs, 40.6% of the animals were found to harbor 1-58 worms of D. immitis (mean 6.5 ± 8.4 worms/infected dog). The QBC analysis and thick blood smear (TBS) method detected microfilaremia in 31.6% and 21.3% of these dogs, respectively. The results of these two methods were highly correlated with the presence of bisexual worms in the dogs. The QBC analysis was more sensitive (55% versus 39%) and efficient (79% versus 72%) than the conventional TBS method. However, accurate speciation of the microfilariae was impossible using the QBC analysis. Although this technique is more sensitive, simpler, and less time-consuming and does not require as much skill or experience in comparison with the conventional TBS method, the failure in speciation of the parasites may limit its usefulness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-248
Number of pages3
JournalParasitology Research
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

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