Global coverage of health information systems for kidney disease: availability, challenges, and opportunities for development

Emily J. See, Mona Alrukhaimi, Gloria E. Ashuntantang, Aminu K. Bello, Ezequiel Bellorin-Font, Mohammed Benghanem Gharbi, Branko Braam, John Feehally, David C. Harris, Vivekanand Jha, Kailash Jindal, Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, Rumeyza Kazancioglu, Adeera Levin, Meaghan Lunney, Ikechi G. Okpechi, Timothy Olusegun Olanrewaju, Mohamed A. Osman, Jeffrey Perl, Bilal QarniHarun Ur Rashid, Ahmed Rateb, Eric Rondeau, Arian Samimi, Majid L.N. Sikosana, Laura Sola, Irma Tchokhonelidze, Natasha Wiebe, Chih Wei Yang, Feng Ye, Alexander Zemchenkov, Ming hui Zhao, David W. Johnson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Development and planning of health care services requires robust health information systems to define the burden of disease, inform policy development, and identify opportunities to improve service provision. The global coverage of kidney disease health information systems has not been well reported, despite their potential to enhance care. As part of the Global Kidney Health Atlas, a cross-sectional survey conducted by the International Society of Nephrology, data were collected from 117 United Nations member states on the coverage and scope of kidney disease health information systems and surveillance practices. Dialysis and transplant registries were more common in high-income countries. Few countries reported having nondialysis chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury registries. Although 62% of countries overall could estimate their prevalence of chronic kidney disease, less than 24% of low-income countries had access to the same data. Almost all countries offered chronic kidney disease testing to patients with diabetes and hypertension, but few to high-risk ethnic groups. Two-thirds of countries were unable to determine their burden of acute kidney injury. Given the substantial heterogeneity in the availability of health information systems, especially in low-income countries and across nondialysis chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury, a global framework for prioritizing development of these systems in areas of greatest need is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-81
Number of pages8
JournalKidney International Supplements
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 02 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017

Keywords

  • acute kidney injury
  • chronic kidney disease
  • end-stage kidney disease
  • health information systems
  • registries
  • screening

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