Identification of a BglI Polymorphism of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Gene, and Association Study with Schizophrenia

Chia Hsiang Chen*, Yu Ru Lee, Mei Ying Liu, Fu Chuan Wei, Farn Jong Koong, Hai Gwo Hwu, Kwang Jen Hsiao

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several linkage studies suggested chromosome 22q 11-13 may harbor susceptible genes for schizophrenia. Catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT), which is involved in the metabolism of catecholamines, was mapped to 22q11 and is considered a possible candidate gene for schizophrenia. Recently, we identified a polymorphic marker, a single nucleotide C insertion at the 3′ untranslated region of the COMT gene, which obliterates a BglI site. Using this BglI polymorphism, we conducted a case-control association study in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. No significant differences of allele and genotype frequencies were noted between patients (N = 177) and controls (N = 99). When patients were subgrouped according to sex, no significant differences of genotype and allele frequencies were noted in either male or female patients compared to normal controls. Our results do not support an association between the BglI polymorphism of COMT gene and schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-559
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics
Volume67
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Association
  • Bgli polymorphism
  • COMT
  • Schizophrenia

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