Insufficient deep-colored vegetable intake is associated with higher fragility fracture rate in postmenopausal Taiwanese women

Chu Hsu Lin, Kai Hua Chen, Chien Min Chen, Hung Chih Hsu, Chia Hao Chang, Cheng Ho, Tung Jung Huang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Osteoporosis-related fragility fracture is a major health issue in older adults. This study has been developed to investigate the relationship of lifestyle factors with fragility fracture prevalence in postmenopausal Taiwanese women. Methods: A total of 1050 postmenopausal women with a mean age of 66.7 ± 8.6 years who lived in the community in western Chiayi County in Taiwan was interviewed with a structured questionnaire collected personal data, lifestyle information and fracture history. Laboratory examinations provided biochemistry data. Fragility fractures were defined as those resulting from low energy impact. The relationship between fragility fracture prevalence and other variables was analyzed. Results: The overall prevalence of fractures of all etiologies and fragility fracture were 18.7% and 9.7%, respectively. Wrist was the most common site of fragility fracture (48 cases). Fragility fracture prevalence in participants who rarely or did not consume deep-colored vegetables was significantly higher than that of those who often consumed deep-colored vegetables: 17.6% versus 9.0%, with an odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-3.68) by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: Insufficient intake of deep-colored vegetables is associated with increased risk of fragility fracture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-79
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gerontology
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 06 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • fragility fracture
  • nutrition
  • osteoporosis
  • postmenopausal
  • vegetables

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