Interleukin-18 gene 105A/C genetic polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility of Kawasaki disease

Shih Yin Chen, Lei Wan, Yu Chuen Huang, Jim Jinn Chyuan Sheu, Yu Ching Lan, Chih Ho Lai, Cheng Wen Lin, Sheng Chang Jeng, Yuhsin Tsai, Shih Ping Liu, Ying Ju Lin, Fuu Jen Tsai*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interleukin-18 (IL-18)-656T/G, -607A/C, and -137C/G promoter polymorphisms had been reported associated with Kawasaki disease (KD). An IL-18 genetic A/C polymorphism at coding position 105 (rs549908) has been linked with asthma, rheumatoid, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We tested a hypothesis that the IL-18 105A/C genetic polymorphism confers KD susceptibility. Study participants were Taiwanese KD patients and a healthy control group. Our data indicated that the frequency of C allele was significantly higher in the patient group (13.9%) than in the control group (2.7%; P<0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 5.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.57-13.73). Therefore, persons with the C allele may have higher risk of deve loping KD. In addition, compared with the haplotype frequencies between case and control groups, the KD patients with TACC haplotype appeared to be a significant "at-risk" haplotype compared with other haplotypes (OR: 4.62, 95% CI: 1.71-12.43; P = 0.001). KD patient with the TAGA haplotype appeared to be a significant "protective" haplotype compared with other haplotypes (OR: 0.51, 95% CI:0.29-0.89; P = 0.017). Our results suggest that 105A/C polymorphism and the haplotypes in IL-18 gene are associated with the risk of KD in Taiwanese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-76
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Interleukin 18 (IL-18)
  • Kawasaki disease (KD)
  • Polymorphism

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