Long-term effects of surgical treatment on baroreflex function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: an 18-month follow-up

Chih Cheng Huang, Hsin Ching Lin, Yun Ru Lai, Nai Wen Tsai, Wei Che Lin, Hung Chen Wang, Chia Te Kung, Ben Chung Cheng, Yu Jih Su, Chih Min Su, Sheng Yuan Hsiao, Cheng Hsien Lu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Depressed baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is reported in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Improvement of BRS short-term after surgical treatment is also reported. We tested the hypothesis that surgical treatment not only improves clinical outcomes, but also improves BRS after 18 months. Methods: Cardiovascular autonomic tests, polysomnography (PSG), and biochemical testing were prospectively evaluated in 54 OSA patients at three time points (preoperatively, 6 months and 18 months postoperatively) and compared with 20, age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched, healthy controls. Results: The BRS increased after surgical treatment at 18-month follow-up, with results similar to the healthy control. Additionally, average O2, mO2 <90% (% per night), and lowest O2 showed an increase after surgical treatment at the 18-month follow-up. Conclusions: Besides improvement in clinical outcomes, depressed BRS in OSA patients is reversible and these patients have the potential for total recovery of baroreflex function after 18 months of treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-158
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume60
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Baroreflex sensitivity
  • Long-term effects
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Surgical outcome

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