Longitudinal analysis of the impact of smoking exposure on atopic indices and allergies in early childhood

Yi Wen Wang, Kuo Wei Yeh, Jing Long Huang, Kuan Wen Su, Ming Han Tsai, Man Chin Hua, Sui Ling Liao, Shen Hao Lai, Chih Yung Chiu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Exposure to smoking is recognized as a health hazard; however, a longitudinal analysis of the impact of smoking exposure in families on the allergic reactions related to childhood atopic diseases has not been well addressed.

METHODS: Children who completed a three-year follow-up period from the birth cohort were included in this study. The history of smoking exposure was recorded, and the urine cotinine levels were measured at 1 and 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years of age. Specific IgE levels against food and mite allergens were measured at age 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years. Their relevance to family smoking exposure and the subsequent development of atopic diseases was also analyzed. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (No. 102-1842C).

RESULTS: A total of 198 infants were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of passive smoking exposure among these children was as high as 45%. The urine cotinine levels were significantly higher in children with history of smoking exposure ( P < 0.001). At 6 months of age, the food-specific IgE levels and the prevalence of eczema were significantly higher in children with smoking exposure than in those without smoking exposure ( P < 0.05). By contrast, the urine cotinine levels were significantly higher in children with IgE sensitization (>100 kU/L, P < 0.05) at 3 years of age, which was also significantly associated with a higher prevalence of allergic rhinitis and development of asthma ( P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: Family smoking exposure appears to be strongly associated with food sensitization in infancy and with IgE production in later childhood. This could potentially increase the susceptibility of developing infantile eczema and subsequent childhood airway allergies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100802
Pages (from-to)100802
JournalWorld Allergy Organization Journal
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 07 2023

Bibliographical note

© 2023 The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Cotinine
  • Eczema
  • Immunoglobulin E
  • Smoking

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