Mirror visual feedback induces M1 excitability by disengaging functional connections of perceptuo-motor-attentional processes during asynchronous bimanual movement: A magnetoencephalographic study

Szu Hung Lin, Chia Hsiung Cheng, Ching Yi Wu*, Chien Ting Liu, Chia Ling Chen, Yu Wei Hsieh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

Abstract

Mirror visual feedback (MVF) has been shown to increase the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) during asynchronous bimanual movement. However, the functional networks underlying this process remain unclear. We recruited 16 healthy volunteers to perform asynchronous bimanual movement, that is, their left hand performed partial range of movement while their right hand performed normal full range of movement. Their ongoing brain activities were recorded by whole-head magnetoencephalography during the movement. Participants were required to keep both hands stationary in the control condition. In the other two conditions, participants were required to perform asynchronous bimanual movement with MVF (Asy_M) and without MVF (Asy_w/oM). Greater M1 excitability was found under Asy_M than under Asy_w/oM. More importantly, when receiving MVF, the visual cortex reduced its functional connection to brain regions associated with perceptuo-motor-attentional process (i.e., M1, superior temporal gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). This is the first study to demonstrate a global functional network of MVF during asynchronous bimanual movement, providing a foundation for future research to examine the neural mechanisms of mirror illusion in motor control.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1092
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Beta rebound oscillation
  • Functional connectivity
  • Magnetoencephalography (MEG)
  • Mirror visual feedback (MVF)
  • Motor cortex

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