Perioperative Complications and Oncologic Outcomes after Radical Cystectomy in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients with Bladder Cancer Obtained Using a Standardized Reporting System

Yu Liang Liu, Chun Te Wu, Yu Chao Hsu, Miao Fen Chen, Chih Shou Chen, Chung Sheng Shi, Yun Ching Huang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We investigated the use of a standardized reporting system to study perioperative complications and oncologic outcomes after radical cystectomy in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with bladder cancer. Methods: We reviewed retrospective outcomes in 141 ESRD patients with bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy between 2004 and 2015. Complications were graded using the Clavien–Dindo classification system with 0–2 classified as “No Major Complications” and Clavien 3–5 as “Major Complications”. Low-volume surgeons were classified as those performing fewer than nine cases during the study. Fisher’s exact test along with the chi-squared test, two-tailed t tests, logistic regression, and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to evaluate all clinically meaningful covariates. Results: Ninety-nine (99, 70.2%) patients had no major complications, and forty-two (29.8%) patients had major complications. Patients in the major complications group were older, had a higher Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and had a longer hospitalization duration than those in the no major complications group (all, p < 0.05). Major complications were also more common when the procedure was performed by low-volume surgeons (p = 0.003). In multivariate logistic regression models, CCI ≥ 5 (p = 0.006) and low-volume surgeon (p = 0.004) were independent predictors of major complications. According to multivariate analysis with the Cox hazards regression, male sex, age > 70 years, CCI ≥ 5, bladder cancer stage ≥ 3, lymphovascular invasion, and experiencing major complications were significant poor prognostic factors for overall survival (all, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Accurate reporting of complications is necessary for preoperative counseling, identifying modifiable risk factors, and planning risk mitigation strategies. High comorbidity and low-volume surgeons were interrelated as notable risk factors for major complications. In addition to tumor-related factors, male sex, older age, and major complications significantly influence overall survival.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3512
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 07 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors.

Keywords

  • bladder
  • cancer
  • complication
  • cystectomy
  • dialysis
  • end-stage renal disease
  • urothelial carcinoma

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