Prenatal transplantation of human amniotic fluid stem cell could improve clinical outcome of type III spinal muscular atrophy in mice

Steven W. Shaw*, Shao Yu Peng, Ching Chung Liang, Tzu Yi Lin, Po Jen Cheng, T’sang T’ang Hsieh, Hao Yu Chuang, Paolo De Coppi, Anna L. David

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a single gene disorder affecting motor function in uterus. Amniotic fluid is an alternative source of stem cell to ameliorate SMA. Therefore, this study aims to examine the therapeutic potential of Human amniotic fluid stem cell (hAFSC) for SMA. Our SMA model mice were generated by deletion of exon 7 of Smn gene and knock-in of human SMN2. A total of 16 SMA model mice were injected with 1 × 105 hAFSC in uterus, and the other 16 mice served as the negative control. Motor function was analyzed by three behavioral tests. Engraftment of hAFSC in organs were assessed by flow cytometry and RNA scope. Frequency of myocytes, neurons and innervated receptors were estimated by staining. With hAFSC transplantation, 15 fetuses survived (93.75% survival) and showed better performance in all motor function tests. Higher engraftment frequency were observed in muscle and liver. Besides, the muscle with hAFSC transplantation expressed much laminin α and PAX-7. Significantly higher frequency of myocytes, neurons and innervated receptors were observed. In our study, hAFSC engrafted on neuromuscular organs and improved cellular and behavioral outcomes of SMA model mice. This fetal therapy could preserve the time window and treat in the uterus.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9158
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 2021

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