Preparation of epigallocatechin gallate-loaded nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and in vivo

Yu Hsin Lin, Chun Lung Feng, Chih Ho Lai, Jui Hsiang Lin, Hao Yun Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

A variety of approaches have been proposed for overcoming the unpleasant side effects associated with antibiotics treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections. Research has shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient in green tea, has antibacterial activity for antiurease activity against H. pylori. Oral EGCG is not good because of its digestive instability and the fact that it often cannot reach the targeted site of antibacterial activity. To localize EGCG to H. pylori infection site, this study developed a fucose-chitosan/gelatin nanoparticle to encapsulate EGCG at the target and make direct contact with the region of microorganisms on the gastric epithelium. Analysis of a simulated gastrointestinal medium indicated that the proposed in vitro nanocarrier system effectively controls the release of EGCG, which interacts directly with the intercellular space at the site of H. pylori infection. Meanwhile, results of in vivo clearance assays indicated that our prepared fucose-chitosan/gelatin/EGCG nanoparticles had a significantly greater H. pylori clearance effect and more effectively reduced H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in the gastric-infected mouse model than the EGCG solution alone.

Original languageEnglish
Article number045006
JournalScience and Technology of Advanced Materials
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 01 08 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Helicobacter pylori
  • epigallocatechin-3-gallate
  • fucose-chitosan
  • gelatin
  • nanoparticles

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