Successful outpatient treatment of renal vein thrombosis by low-molecular weight heparins in 3 patients with nephrotic syndrome

C. H. Wu, S. F. Ko, C. H. Lee, B. C. Cheng, K. T. Hsu, J. B. Chen, Y. S. Chien, C. C. Yang, M. C. Huang, F. R. Chuang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Renal vein thrombosis (RV Thromb) is a serious complication of nephrotic syndrome. Anticoagulation is usually recommended as the treatment of choice. This study reports 3 nephrotic patients diagnosed to have RVThromb combined with thromboembolic events. Low-molecular weight heparin (LMWHep) was given subcutaneously every 12 hours following the diagnosis of RVTromb, which continued at the outpatient clinic after an average of 11 in-hospital days. The patients visited the nephrology outpatient clinic every other week and underwent magnetic resonance image (MRI) studies at 6-week intervals for follow-up of patency of the involved renal vein. LMWHep was discontinued when MRI showed this patency. The average outpatient treatment period was 74 days. There was no recurrent RVThromb in the follow-up course of 6 months after discontinuation of LMWHep. Kidney function was preserved, as indicated by image studies and serial renal function tests. LMWHep produced a more predictable anti-coagulant effect, a superior bioavailability, a longer half-life and a dose-independent effect than unfractionated heparin and coumadin. These benefits made the outpatient treatment of RVThromb possible. Our report recommends outpatient treatment of RVThromb by LMWHep because it is feasible, effective and safe.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-440
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Nephrology
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 06 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Low-molecular weight heparin
  • Outpatient
  • Renal vein thrombosis

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