Targeted Sequencing of Circulating Cell Free DNA Can Be Used to Monitor Therapeutic Efficacy of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Chiuan Chian Chiou, Chih Liang Wang, Ji Dung Luo, Chien Ying Liu, How Wen Ko, Cheng Ta Yang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aim: Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) bears specific mutations derived from tumor cells. The amount of mutant ctDNA may reflect tumor burden. In this study, we detected epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in ctDNA as a monitoring marker for the response of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients and Methods: Serial plasma samples from eight NSCLC patients during TKI treatment were collected. Libraries with barcoded adapters were constructed from ctDNA of these plasma samples using a PCR-based targeted DNA panel. The libraries were then sequenced for measuring EGFR mutations. In addition, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was also measured in these patients. Results: In six patients who suffered disease progression (PD), five had elevated EGFR mutation reads before PD. In the two patients who did not develop PD, EGFR mutations remained undetectable in their plasma. The CEA levels were higher than the cutoff value in most samples and had a poor correlation with disease status. Conclusion: The mutation count of tumor-specific mutations can be a monitoring marker of TKI treatment in NSCLC patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-423
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Genomics and Proteomics
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 International Institute of Anticancer Research. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Circulating tumor DNA
  • EGFR mutation
  • Monitoring markers
  • Non-small cell lung cancer

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