Temporary assisting suspension suture technique for successful microvascular anastomosis of extremely small and thin walled vessels for mice transplantation surgery

Ali Engin Ulusal*, Betul Gozel Ulusal, Li Man Hung, Fu Chan Wei

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dissection and microsurgical anastomosis in small and thin-walled vessels is challenging. Temporary assisting suspension suture technique was developed to overcome those difficulties in establishing successful composite tissue allotransplantation in mice. The operations were performed in 12- to 16-week-old Balb/c mice weighing 25 to 30 grams as both donor and recipient animals. Extended vascularized groin cutaneous flaps based on the superficial epigastric vessels were used. A total of 10 groin cutaneous flaps were transplanted. Three temporary assisting suspension sutures of 11-0 nylon were placed at the 12-, 4-, and 8-o'clock positions to donor and recipient artery and vein before the anastomosis. This technique allowed atraumatic dissection of delicate and thin vessels, prevented vessel wall collapse, and facilitated adequate exposure of the lumen during placement of the permanent microvascular sutures. Thus, the microvascular anastomosis was performed in an unusual manner. The temporary assisting suspension sutures were removed just before the permanent suture was tied down. The mean operation time was 1 hour and 45 minutes with an ischemia time of 1 hour. Ninety-percent success in immediate and late-term patency rates was achieved, which was confirmed by transplant survival. This technique was proven to be useful for microvascular anastomosis in thin-walled vessels and is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1438-1441
Number of pages4
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume116
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 2005

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