The analgesic effect of intravenous lidocaine versus intrawound or epidural bupivacaine for postoperative opioid reduction in spine surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sung Huang Laurent Tsai, Yagiz Ugur Yolcu, Shao Wen Hung, Shyam J. Kurian, Mohammed Ali Alvi, Tsai Sheng Fu, Mohamad Bydon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pain management following spine surgery remains a challenge. The significant use of opioids may lead to opioid-related adverse events. These complications can increase perioperative morbidity and rapidly expend health care resources by developing chronic pain. Although intraoperative pain control for surgery has been studied in the literature, a thorough assessment of the effect in spine surgery is rarely reported. The objective of the present study was to examine the outcomes of intraoperative intravenous lidocaine and intrawound or epidural bupivacaine use in spine surgery. Methods: An electronic literature search was conducted for studies on the use of lidocaine and bupivacaine in spine surgery for all years available. Only articles in English language were included. Postoperative opioid consumption, VAS score, nausea/vomiting, and length of hospital stay comprised the outcomes of interest. Pooled descriptive statistics with Risk Ratios (RR), Mean Differences (MD) and 95 % confidence interval were used to synthesize the outcomes for each medication. Results: A total of 10 studies (n = 579) were included in the analysis. Comparison of the opioid consumption revealed a significant mean difference between lidocaine and bupivacaine (MD: −12.25, and MD: −0.4, respectively, p = 0.01), favoring lidocaine. With regard to postoperative VAS, the pooled effect of both groups decreased postoperative pain (MD: −0.61 (95 % CI: −1.14, −0.08)), with a more significant effect in the lidocaine group (MD: −0.84, (95 % CI: −1.21, −0.48)). There was no significant effect in length of stay, and postoperative nausea/vomiting. Conclusions: The results of the present meta-analysis indicate that lidocaine and bupivacaine use may decrease postoperative pain and opioid consumption. Lidocaine had a stronger effect on the reduction of opioid consumption compared to bupivacaine.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106438
JournalClinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
Volume201
DOIs
StatePublished - 02 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Bupivacaine
  • Lidocaine
  • Opioid consumption
  • Postoperative pain
  • Spine surgery

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