The change in circulating tumor cells before and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is associated with survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

Hung Ming Wang, Min Hsien Wu, Pei Hung Chang, Hung Chi Lin, Chun Da Liao, Sheng Min Wu, Tsung Min Hung, Chine Yu Lin, Joseph Tung-Chieh Chang, Yen Tzu-Tsen, Jason Chia Hsun Hsieh*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal Article peer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to evaluate the role of baseline circulating tumor cells (CTCs) before and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy and attempted to determine the impacts of CTCs on the outcomes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: CTCs were detected using a negative selection strategy and flow cytometry protocol. Results: We observed a significant correlation between baseline CTCs and staging (P = 0.001). The CTC counts were significantly reduced within 2-4 weeks in 47 concurrent chemoradiotherapy responders (P < 0.001). Change of CTC counts correlates with progression-free survival (PFS, P = 0.01) and overall survival (OS, P = 0.01). CTC decline status was an independent prognostic factor in PFS (P = 0.03) and OS (P = 0.05) in multivariate analyses. Conclusion: In chemoradiotherapy responders, CTCs are significantly reduced. CTC decline within the first month indicates a longer PFS and OS, suggesting that the dynamics of CTCs could be more important than CTC number alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2676-2687
Number of pages12
JournalHead and Neck
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 08 2019

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Keywords

  • cancer
  • circulating tumor cells
  • concurrent chemoradiotherapy
  • patients with cancer
  • survival

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The change in circulating tumor cells before and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is associated with survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this